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Targa excitement building in TSD category

One of the fastest growing categories in tarmac road rallying around the world is TSD – and it’s the same case for Targa Tasmania.

Tasmanian team Alan and Heather Gluyas
The name TSD stands for time, speed and distance and the main difference from outright competition is that cars must target a set average speed for each stage or face penalties, plus they must never exceed the speed limit of 130 km/hr.

Tasmanian team Alan and Heather Gluyas, from Kettering in the South of the state, have completed a number of Targa type events in TSD and have met with considerable success.

“TSD is often described as a speed-limited style of racing, but it’s a little misleading when you look at the stage times,” Alan said.

“Our stage times would have placed us in the top third of the outright field,” he said. “We’re as quick through the tighter stages as some of the leading cars.”

“The longer stages can get a bit dull when we can only do 130 on the straights as opposed to 240, but the tighter stages are very exciting,” he said.

Alan and Heather have been pace-setters in the TSD category since joining the competition, finishing third in Targa Tasmania last year and winning Targa High Country and the new Targa Hellyer Gorge event, introduced earlier this year.

Alan said one of the attractions to competing in TSD was its surprisingly challenging nature.

“You have to communicate with your navigator more and plan how fast to go in certain stages, to ensure you arrive at the end as close as possible to the nominated average speed, while not exceeding 130 km/hr,” he said.

“There’s definitely a lot more strategy involved in TSD compared to other Targa classes.”

Alan and Heather are aiming for a podium in this year’s Targa Tasmania - and the higher the better according to Alan.

“It’s going to be a tough competition though – everyone in TSD has to be considered serious contenders because of the strategic nature of the class,” he said.

The Kettering pair will be competing in a competitive Toyota 86 GTS – a car they have campaigned for the past two years.

“It has a two-litre flat four cylinder engine – and ours is supercharged,” Alan said.
“It’s handling is superb and it can match it with the Porsches in the tighter stuff,” he said.

ENDS

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