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Sports Trophy puts the fun in Targa for Pisko

Hobart’s Peter Pisko will be aiming to break his Targa duck in next week’s Budget Sports Trophy section of the event.

Peter finished second in the past two Targa Tasmania events in the regularity section, which has now morphed into the TSD (time, speed, distance) Trophy competition.

However, Peter has switched classes to sports trophy and is hoping to finish on the top step of the podium this time.

The TSD competition requires drivers and navigators to calculate a set average speed for stages while also not exceeding 130 km/hr at any point.

The main point of difference between sports trophy and thoroughbred trophy (for classic cars), when compared to TSD, is the lack of an average speed component.

“I can see how the challenge of TSD would appeal to some teams, but the sports trophy looks like a lot more fun for me without the stress,” Peter said.

“We’re still not allowed to go over 130 km/hr – which I reckon is a safe speed – it keeps us fairly restrained,” he said.

“With sports trophy average speed doesn’t come into it - we can just go for it, as long as we keep below 130,” he said.

“I experienced the new sports trophy category for the first time earlier this year in Targa Hellyer Gorge and loved it – it’s certainly the class for me.”

“I can see it becoming one of the fastest growing categories of Targa Tasmania.”

Peter’s trusty Nissan 350Z, which took him to two second places in regularity competition, has now been retired as it no longer meets sports trophy specifications.

“It was too highly modified, so I’ve bought myself a limited edition Audi TTRS – it’s one of only 45 in Australia,” Peter said.

“The car has only arrived from Melbourne this week and it’s been in the workshop having safety upgrades, including a fire extinguisher and a rally safe GPS system fitted, so I haven’t even driven it yet,” he said.

“I’ve asked a mate from New Zealand to navigate for me – he’s never been in a rally car before, so it will all be a bit new for us.”

Despite his unfamiliarity with his car and having a novice navigator on board, Peter is still fairly confident of a good result.

“The car’s very quick and it’s got all-wheel-drive, so we’re confident we can do well,” he said.
“We’re definitely in it to win it.”


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